It’s FOMO Week

It’s FOMO Week

This week is a new experiment for the blog, as we'll look at a single aspect of an overarching topic each day. So, rather than trying to cover everything there is to know about FOMO today, we'll simply look at an overview of it. Tomorrow, we'll come back to examine a specific aspect of FOMO, and we'll continue to do so for the rest of the week. Later, these posts will be collected to create something more comprehensive. What is FOMO? The acronym represents the phrase Fear of Missing Out, a "condition" that has arisen due to our always-on, always-available nature. While you’re more likely to find FOMO’s definition in the Urban Dictionary instead of psychology textbooks, more people are discussing this phenomenon. When we can text, email, Facebook, Skype, Hangout, Tweet, Tumbl, Instagram... Well, you see how we can get a bit of social schizophrenia. We believe we need to be everywhere and do everything in order to keep up. It's like high school pressure across an infinite number of digital channels.

College Humor's spoof movie-trailer explains FOMO perfectly.

Even if you don't see yourself in the extreme example College Humor presents (although I can easily see some people just like that), you probably feel those twinges daily. Think about how often you check your email each day. Do you really need to know if you have emergencies that often? Will your world come crashing down if you don't respond within an hour?

These are some of the questions we'll examine more in depth throughout this week.

We’ll also take a closer look at how these networks and services we use notify us to come hurrying back to get the latest information. We’ll examine how introverts and extroverts handle these pressures and how their different mindsets affect their responses.

What Do You Think?

Do you have a severe fear of missing out? Is it something you even think about?

The FOMO Diagnosis

The FOMO Diagnosis

Clear Explanations Needed: Clarity in a World of Specialization

Clear Explanations Needed: Clarity in a World of Specialization